Dec 022012
 

Resolved, that two Battalions of Marines be raised consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors & Officers as usual in other regiments, that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken that no persons be appointed to office or inlisted into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea, when required. That they be inlisted and commissioned for and during the present war with Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by Congress. That they be distinguished by the names of the first & second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered a part of the number, which the continental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of.
—Resolution of the Continental Congress on 10 November 1775

Gone to Florida to fight the Indians. Will be back when the war is over.
—Commandant Col Archibald Henderson, USMC, (5th CMC) on a note pinned to his office door, 1836

The Marines…will never disappoint the most sanguine expectations of their country—never! I have never known one who would not readily advance in battle.
—Capt C. W. Morgan, USN in a letter to Brevet BGen Archibald Henderson, (5th CMC) 1852

I should deem a man-of-war incomplete without a body of Marines…imbued with that esprit that has so long characterized the “Old Corps.”
—Commodore Joshua R. Sands, USN in a letter to Brevet BGen Archibald Henderson, (5th CMC) 1852

Visit the Navy-Yard, and behold a marine, such a man as an American government can make, or such as it can make a man with its black arts, —a mere shadow and reminiscence of humanity, a man laid out alive and standing, and already, as one may say, buried under arms with funeral accompaniments…
—Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience, 1854

Tell it to the Marines. —It is generally agreed that this is probably of British origin dating back to King Charles II

Tell that to the Marines – the sailors won’t believe it.
—Sir Walter Scott, Redgauntlet, Vol. II, Chapter 7

Resolved, that two Battalions of Marines be raised consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors & Officers as usual in other regiments, that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken that no persons be appointed to office or inlisted into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea, when required. That they be inlisted and commissioned for and during the present war with Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by Congress. That they be distinguished by the names of the first & second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered a part of the number, which the continental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of.
—Resolution of the Continental Congress on 10 November 1775 

Gone to Florida to fight the Indians. Will be back when the war is over.

—Commandant Col Archibald Henderson, USMC, (5th CMC) on a note pinned to his office door, 1836

The Marines…will never disappoint the most sanguine expectations of their country—never! I have never known one who would not readily advance in battle.
—Capt C. W. Morgan, USN in a letter to Brevet BGen Archibald Henderson, (5th CMC) 1852

I should deem a man-of-war incomplete without a body of Marines…imbued with that esprit that has so long characterized the “Old Corps.”
—Commodore Joshua R. Sands, USN in a letter to Brevet BGen Archibald Henderson, (5th CMC) 1852

Visit the Navy-Yard, and behold a marine, such a man as an American government can make, or such as it can make a man with its black arts, —a mere shadow and reminiscence of humanity, a man laid out alive and standing, and already, as one may say, buried under arms with funeral accompaniments…
—Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience, 1854

A ship without Marines is like a garment without buttons.

— Adm David G. Farragut, 1862

I would rather command a company of Marines than a brigade of volunteers.
—Remark attributed to Capt John R.F. Tattnall, Confederate States Marine Corps, in explaining why he resigned his Army commission as a colonel and his post as acting brigade commander in Nov. 1862 to resume his work as a Marine captain.

If the Marines are abolished half the efficiency of the Navy will be destroyed. They are as necessary to the well being of a ship as the officers. Instead of decreasing the Corps, I would rather hope to see a large increase, for we feel the want of Marines very much.
—RAdm David D. Porter in letter to Col Commandant John Harris, 6th CMC, 6 Dec. 1863

Throughout my professional life, I have looked upon the Corps as a most valuable part of our naval organization, and this opinion has only been the more confirmed by every year’s additional experience in active service.
—RAdm S. F. DuPont in letter to Col Commandant John Harris, 6th CMC, 29 Dec. 1863

On board the new Ironsides, I had the Marine guard stationed at the after gun, thirty-five in number, and I think it was conceded that no gun of that heavy battery was worked more efficiently than the “Marine gun” as it was called.
—Cmdr T. Turner in letter to Col Commandant John Harris, 6th CMC, 29 Dec. 1863

Sir: It gives me pleasure to report to you the fine bearing and soldierly conduct of Captain Wilson and his men whilst absent on special duty. Though their duties were more arduous than those of others, they were always prompt and ready for performance of all they were called upon to do. As a body they would be a credit to any organization, and I will be glad to be associated with them on duty at any time.
— Letter from Cmdr J. Taylor Wood, C.S. Navy, to Confederate Marine Commandant Col Lloyd J. Beal, 16 Feb. 1864, in praise of CSA Marines commanded by Capt Thomas S. Wilson for their service in “cutting out” and destroying USS Underwriter on the Neuse River. 2 Feb. 1864.

Come on you sons of bitches! Do you want to live forever?
—Gunnery Sergeant Dan Daly urging Marines to attack in 1918 France.

I hear we rate the Croix la [sic] Guerre on our regimental flag, but don’t know how true that is. Anyway, the Marines are doing their share. I heard the Germans call us the devil dogs, but that probably is hot air.”
—Pvt Leonard D. Philo 6th Regiment, 2dDiv from June 22, 1917 to July 19, 1918

Their fiery advance and great tenacity were well recognized by their opponents.
—LtCol Ernst Otto, Historical Section of the German Army writing about U.S. Marines in the fighting at in 1918 Belleau Wood, France

What shall I say of the gallantry with which these Marines have fought! Of the slopes of Hill 142; of the Mares Farm; of the Bois de Belleau and the Village of Bouresches stained with their blood, and not only taken away from the Germans in the full tide of their advance against the French, but held by my boys against counter attacks day after day and night after night. I cannot write of their splendid gallantry without tears coming to my eyes.
—MajGen James G. Harbord, USA, in his book, “Leaves from a War Diary”

No one can say that the Marines have ever failed to do their work in handsome fashion.
—MajGen Johnson Hagood, USA

I can never again see a United States Marine without experiencing a feeling of reverence.
—MajGen Johnson Hagood, USA

The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years.
—Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal to LtGen H. M. Smith, as the Marines raised the flag on Mt. Suribachi over Iwo Jima, 23 Feb. 1945

Marines have a cynical approach to war. They believe in three things; liberty, payday and that when two Marines are together in a fight, one is being wasted. Being a minority group militarily, they are proud and sensitive in their dealings with other military organizations. A Marine’s concept of a perfect battle is to have other Marines on the right and left flanks, Marine aircraft overhead and Marine artillery and naval gunfire backing them up.
—War correspondent Ernie Pyle, killed on Ie Shima, Ryukyu Archipelago, 1945

A man with a flag in his pack and the desire to put it on an enemy strong point isn’t likely to bug out.
—Col Lewis B. “Chesty “ Puller to an Army staff officer who, watching Marines raise the flag over Seoul, complained “Marines would rather carry a flag into battle than a weapon.”

 Posted by at 9:19 am
Aug 132012
 

I regret giving up on the Hachi when insurance wanted to total her. Well here are some older pictures before the SR20DET swap. If any one needs help or advice on the swap drop me a email and i will try to help as best as i can.

 Posted by at 8:42 pm
Jul 052012
 

There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.

Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

A Marine is a Marine.  I set that policy two weeks ago – there’s no such thing as a former Marine.   You’re a Marine,  just in a different uniform and you’re in a different phase of your life.  But you’ll always be a Marine because you went to Parris Island, San Diego or the hills of Quantico.  There’s no such thing as a former Marine.

General James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps

The safest place in Korea was right behind a platoon of Marines. Lord, how they could fight!

MGen. Frank E. Lowe, USA; Korea, 26 January 1952

We have two companies of Marines running rampant all over the northern half of this island, and three Army regiments pinned down in the southwestern corner, doing nothing. What the hell is going on? 

Gen. John W. Vessey Jr., USA, Chairman of the the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the assault on Grenada, 1983

The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!  

Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady of the United States, 1945

Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don’t have that problem. 

Ronald Reagan, President of the United States; 1985

Marines I see as two breeds, Rottweilers or Dobermans, because Marines come in two varieties, big and mean, or skinny and mean. They’re aggressive on the attack and tenacious on defense. They’ve got really short hair and they always go for the throat. 

RAdm. “Jay” R. Stark, USN; 10 November 1995

Marines die, that’s what we’re here for. But the Marine Corps lives forever. And that means YOU live forever. 

The mythical GySgt. Hartman, USMC; portrayed by GySgt. R. Lee Ermey, a Marine Corps Drill Instructor using his own choice of words in Full Metal Jacket, 1987

A Marine should be sworn to the patient endurance of hardships, like the ancient knights; and it is not the least of these necessary hardships to have to serve with sailors.  

Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

You cannot exaggerate about the Marines. They are convinced to the point of arrogance, that they are the most ferocious fighters on earth- and the amusing thing about it is that they are. 

Father Kevin Keaney, 1st Marine Division Chaplain, Korean War

By their victory, the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions and other units of the Fifth Amphibious Corps have made an accounting to their country which only history will be able to value fully. Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue.  

Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, U.S. Navy

The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle. 

Gen. John “Black Jack” Pershing, U.S. Army, Commander of American Forces in World War I

Do not attack the First Marine Division. Leave the yellowlegs alone. Strike the American Army. 

Orders given to Communist troops in the Korean War; shortly afterward, the Marines were ordered to not wear their khaki leggings.

I’ve always been proud of being a Marine. I won’t hesitate to defend the Corps. 

Jonathan Winters, comic and Marine

Every Marine is, first and foremost, a rifleman. All other conditions are secondary. 

Gen. A. M. Gray, USMC, Commandant of the Marine Corps

 

 

 Posted by at 9:32 pm
May 062012
 

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Apr 282012
 

Well i have had some time to take my 300zx apart and eliminate some of the possible problems. It has now become apparent that the bottom of the motor is toast some where. After switching the lifters and inspecting the valve train the knock will not go away. So there is a fresh JDM motor on the way that I will transplant into her to get her back on the road. Currently, the motor is out and on the motor stand and will be posting a few pictures up soon. as i dissect the bottom of the motor for the problem.